Endangered species thrive on U.S. military ranges

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Home On The Bombing Range
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Home On The Bombing Range
A sign warns visitors of the dangers involved when entering the seaside hills of San Clemente Island, where North America's rarest bird calls home Wednesday, July 17, 2013. In the decade since the Navy left the Puerto Rican island of Vieques, bombardments and live-fire trainings have grown exponentially on this windswept California island , which has special federal status because of its biological diversity. Since then, endangered species like the island fox, night lizard and loggerhead shrike have grown in number too, thriving alongside the blasts after nearing extinction. It's a phenomenon happening at military installations across the nation where endangered species are flourishing despite the drills.(AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)