Superheroes invade Seattle; fans go wild

Superheroes invade Seattle; fans go wild »Play Video
Lou Ferrigno, aka "The Incredible Hulk," was one of the superheroes who came to Seattle for the Emerald City Comicon.
SEATTLE - Stars of the comic and sci-fi world came out Saturday in downtown Seattle for the Emerald City Comicon - and you could tell this was no dentists' convention.

The two-day event, which continues Sunday at the Washington State Convention Center, was filled with characters ripped from the tattered pages of your childhood comics.

And many of the hard-core fans who showed up were there to see a living legend - or two.

Some of the longest lines stretched to see Stan Lee, who created some of the most famous superheroes of all time, including Spider-man and many other legends.

"First time meeting Stan Lee - I am pumped!" exclaimed fan Paul Whittingslow, who brought his prized comics to be autographed.

"Stan Lee did this one back in the '60s - I think in '66. Then I also have the first Rhino," Whittingslow explains.

Lee says the love he gets from fans is overwhelming.

"Comic book superhero fans are a world of their own," says Lee. "Their enthusiasm is indescribable."

Just across the aisle, fans could get up close and personal with the Incredible Hulk, aka Lou Ferrigno.

Ferrigno says comic books are a safe haven for kids - especially these days.

"Very positive - great for kids - because, get away from drugs and to create a positive environment, because there is so much violence in videos and drugs," he says. "This is something that is stimulating - a very, very positive."

Erin Gray from the early '80s show Buck Rogers says the huge crowds prove the enduring love for fantasy and science fiction.

"And here it is 30 years later, and look - I've got a line of people who love the show, and remember it. I'm touched. I'm amazed," she says.

Lee says no matter how many of his superheros jump from the page to the big screen, it's still all about telling good stories.

"I think people have always liked stories about people who are bigger than life," he says.

And the bigger the hero - the bigger the crowd that showed up to see them.