Don't let a scammer ruin your vacation

It's no fun getting scammed on vacation. Here's how to reduce your risk.

Remove everything from your wallet that you won't need on your travels. Only take the ID, credit cards and debit cards you’ll need.

The fraud fighters at the Federal Trade Commission advise leaving your Social Security card at home. If you have a Medicare card, make a copy and carry that and blot out all but the last four digits on it.

When you're on the go, you'll probably use public Wi-Fi. That can be risky.

"It may be free, but it may not be secure,” warns Adam Levin, chairman of IDentity Theft 911.  “You run the risk that something is sitting somewhere near you and intercepting what you're sending."

It’s important to make sure you’re on the authorized network before you connect. Scammers love to bait their victims with free connections.

"Hackers and thieves will set up hot-spots to look exactly like the one you think you're at, but they'll be spelled slightly differently or they'll be an additional word in the name,” Levin explained.

By the way, if you travel with a laptop, keep a close eye on it. That’s especially important as you make your way through airport security.

More Info: A Scam-Free Vacation