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Sea-centered company goes green with new Seattle headquarters

Sea-centered company goes green with new Seattle headquarters
Over 200 political, business and philanthropic leaders from the Seattle community celebrated the grand opening of the certified pending LEED Platinum Harley & Lela Franco Maritime Center on Harbor Island. August 27th 2013. (Joshua Lewis / KOMO News)
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SEATTLE -- The new headquarters for Seattle-based Harley Marine Services is officially open and boasting its green amenities for the public to see.

The Harley and Lela Franco Maritime Center unveiled its 45,000-square-foot, four-story building on Harbor Island last week.

According to Harley Marine, the building is LEED Gold certified in its design and environmentally friendly features, but the maritime services company is hoping to exceed those standards with a LEED Platinum designation in the future.

Mithun, Inc. designed the Center, and the Schuchart Corporation helped build it. This is the same general contractor who had a hand in Capitol Hill's Bullitt Center, which is regarded as the greenest commercial building in the world.

Some of the highlights of the Maritime Center include: an open-air atrium, a large outdoor deck overlooking the water, glass window walls, natural wood finishes, a touch pond - where people can touch underwater creatures such as starfish and sea anemones, more than 100 solar panels on the roof and 12 electric car chargers in the parking lot.

The company, which stores and transports oil to a number of ports throughout the country, says its goal was to create a sustainable, environmentally friendly office building for its employees that matched its goals for long-term growth and success.

HMS has operated in Seattle for more than 30 years, and according to Mayor Mike McGinn, who attended the building's opening celebration, is one of the city's primary partners in the maritime industry.

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