Healthworks

Measles off to a fast start, as cases trend up

Measles off to a fast start, as cases trend up
CDC photo shows child with classic measles rash.
Health officials are worried about recent U.S. measles outbreaks that so far have caused more illnesses than at the same point of any year since 1996.

Wellness programs grow more popular with employers

Wellness programs grow more popular with employers
Dominion Resources Inc. nuclear power station plant manager, Roy Simmons talks about his participation in a wellness program at the plant in Surry, Va.
More companies are starting or expanding wellness programs that aim to reduce their medical costs by improving their employees' health.

Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

DNA alternative to Pap smear sparks medical debate

A high-tech screening tool for cervical cancer is facing pushback from more than a dozen patient groups, who warn that the genetic test could displace a simpler, cheaper and more established mainstay of women's health: the Pap smear.

Washington State University considers med school

Washington State University considers med school
This Oct. 10, 2013 photo from Washington State University shows the new Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences building, left, on the campus in Spokane, Wash. (AP Photo/Washington State University, Cori Medeiros)
Medical officials predict an aging population and expanded health coverage under the Affordable Care Act will contribute to doctor shortages across the nation. In response to the projected need, Washington State University has begun exploring the feasibility of opening a medical school on its Spokane campus.

Dieters move past calories, food makers follow

Dieters move past calories, food makers follow
FILE - This Jan. 31, 2006 file photo, boxes of Kellogg's Special K cereal are on display at a supermarket in an Omaha, Neb. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
The calorie counting that defined dieting for so long is giving way to other considerations, like the promise of more fiber or natural ingredients

Noses, ears made in Britain: UK touts lab-grown organs

Noses, ears made in Britain: UK touts lab-grown organs
Dr Michelle Griffin, a plastic research fellow, examines a synthetic polymer ear at her research facility in the Royal Free Hospital in London, Monday, March 31, 2014.
In a north London hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in a bold attempt to make body parts in the laboratory.

Pfizer reports promising results for cancer drug

An experimental drug has shown encouraging results in treating advanced breast cancer in an early clinical trial, pharmaceutical giant Pfizer reported Sunday.

Studies find new drugs greatly lower cholesterol

Studies find new drugs greatly lower cholesterol
People attend the American College of Cardiology's conference in Washington, Saturday, March 29, 2014.
A new class of experimental medicines can dramatically lower cholesterol, raising hopes of a fresh option for people who can't tolerate or don't get enough help from Lipitor and other statin drugs that have been used for this for decades.

Study finds many preteens have high cholesterol

Study finds many preteens have high cholesterol
There's fresh evidence that a lot of young people could be headed for heart trouble. A large study of preteens in Texas found that about one-third of them had borderline or high cholesterol when tested during routine physical exams.

Autism may be tied to flawed prenatal brain growth

A small study that examined brains from children who died found abnormal patterns of cell growth in autistic children. The research bolsters evidence that something before birth might cause autism, at least in some cases.

FDA reviews DNA-based colon cancer screening kits

The Food and Drug Administration is weighing the benefits and risks of two experimental colon cancer screening tests which use DNA from a patient's stool to detect dangerous tumors and growths.

Kids learn stroke signs in class through imitation

Kids learn stroke signs in class through imitation
In this Feb. 25, 2014 photo, third-graders, from left, Hunter Thomas, Matthew Velez, Sebastian Mendez, Jayden Gonzalez and Elijah Farias examine a plastic model of a brain at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx borough of New York. (AP Photo/Jim Fitzgerald)
Andrea Esteban tried to smile with half her face, crossing her eyes in the process, and her third-grade classmates giggled. Matthew Velez struggled to speak, "Luh, luh, uh, gronk," and the kids erupted in laughter.

Half of US adults 40 to 75 eligible for statins

Half of US adults 40 to 75 eligible for statins
FILE - This 2011 photo provided by Watson Pharmaceuticals Inc. shows bottles of Atorvastatin Calcium tablets, a generic form of Lipitor which is sold under a deal with Pfizer. (AP Photo/Watson Pharmaceuticals Inc., Bill Gallery)
Almost half of Americans ages 40 to 75 and nearly all men over 60 qualify to consider cholesterol-lowering statin drugs under new heart disease prevention guidelines, an analysis concludes.