Healthworks

Study: Bacteria live even in healthy placentas

Study: Bacteria live even in healthy placentas
Dr. Kjersti Aagaard is seen in her laboratory at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.
Surprising new research shows a small but diverse community of bacteria lives in the placentas of healthy pregnant women, overturning the belief that fetuses grow in a pretty sterile environment.

Train derailment fuels sleep apnea screening talks

A deadly Metro-North train derailment last year in which the "dazed" engineer was found to have sleep apnea has pushed the commuter railroad to look into establishing screening for the condition, which could include measuring operators' necks and asking them and their spouses about snoring habits.

Consumers losing doctors with new insurance plans

Consumers losing doctors with new insurance plans
Michelle Pool, who is diabetic and has had a hip replacement, can no longer use her primary care doctor under health reform.
Some consumers who bought insurance under President Barack Obama's health care law have buyer's remorse after realizing that their longtime doctors aren't accepting the new plans.

Schools seek upgrades to entice healthy eating

Schools seek upgrades to entice healthy eating
Students eat their lunch in the cafeteria at Thomas Jefferson High School in Dallas, Friday, April 18, 2014. The cafeteria is among those in the Dallas Independent School District that have been upgraded in the last several years. School districts across the U.S. have been making upgrades in recent years to try and entice children into healthier eating habits amid higher federal nutrition standards that emphasize whole grains, fruit and vegetables. But for many, funding such improvements has been a challenge. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Industrial blenders mix up smoothies for students in New York while some schools in California are adding salad bars. In Dallas, campus cafeterias use pass-through coolers and warmers to make sure the food is just right before it's served.

The doctor's in - through webcam, smartphone

The doctor's in - through webcam, smartphone
Mark Matulaitis is seen with his laptop that he uses for virtual house calls with his neurologist in his home in Salisbury, Md.
Welcome to the virtual house call, the latest twist on telemedicine. It's increasingly getting attention as a way to conveniently diagnose simple maladies, such as whether that runny nose and cough is a cold or the flu.

Researcher: technology not to blame for teen woes

Danah Boyd has made a name for herself at the research division of Microsoft for painstaking work examining social media, Big Data and the tension between public and private lives, but it's her teens'-eye view of the digital world that sets her apart.

Forget the spa -- dentists in demand for Botox

Forget the spa -- dentists in demand for Botox

Most people aren't looking for any extra time in the dentist chair.  You go for cleanings and hope to avoid needles and drills.  But a growing number of people are turning to their dentists for an extra shot, as Botox becomes a growing trend in dental care.

Studies find 'young' blood rejuvenates aging mice

Studies find 'young' blood rejuvenates aging mice
This combination of images provided by Lida Katsimpardi in May 2014 shows 3-D reconstructions of brain blood vessels in, from left, a young mouse, an old mouse, and an old mouse who was exposed to the blood of a young mouse. Older mice got stronger, exercised longer and performed better mentally after they were injected with blood from young mice, or even just with a substance that's more abundant in younger blood according to three papers published online Sunday, May 4, 2014 by the journals Science and Nature Medicine. (AP Photo/Lida Katsimpardi)
If Mickey Mouse is feeling his age at 86, scientists may have found just the tonic: the blood of younger mice.

Where will calorie labels appear? Not just menus

Diners could soon see calorie counts on the menus of chain restaurants. But will they be able to get that same clear information at grocery stores, convenience stores, movie theaters or airplanes?

Measles off to a fast start, as cases trend up

Measles off to a fast start, as cases trend up
CDC photo shows child with classic measles rash.
Health officials are worried about recent U.S. measles outbreaks that so far have caused more illnesses than at the same point of any year since 1996.

Wellness programs grow more popular with employers

Wellness programs grow more popular with employers
Dominion Resources Inc. nuclear power station plant manager, Roy Simmons talks about his participation in a wellness program at the plant in Surry, Va.
More companies are starting or expanding wellness programs that aim to reduce their medical costs by improving their employees' health.