NFL accused of denying concussion impacts

NFL accused of denying concussion impacts
In this Sept. 23, 2012, file photo, Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III hits the turf during a game against the Cincinnati Bengals. Griffin was later determined to have suffered a concussion. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Brothers Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru have accused the NFL of downplaying the medical affects of football head injuries in their new book “League of Denial.”

The authors write that, during an autopsy, pathologist Bennet Omalu discovered former Pittsburgh Steelers center Mike Webster suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease caused by multiple head injuries which could explain why the former hometown hero’s life had spiraled out of control before his death.

NPR reports:

"He thought that well, this is information that the National Football League would probably like to have," Fainaru says. "He says he thought [the NFL] would give him a big wet kiss and describe him as a hero."

That's not what happened. Instead, the NFL formed its own committee to research brain trauma. The league sent its findings to the medical journal Neurosurgery, says Fainaru-Wada. "They publish in that journal repeatedly over the period of several years, papers that really minimize the dangers of concussions. They talk about [how] there doesn't appear to be any problem with players returning to play. They even go so far as to suggest that professional football players do not suffer from repetitive hits to the head in football games."

Check out the full story from NPR.