Healthworks

Shades of Pigpen: We travel with our own germs

Shades of Pigpen: We travel with our own germs
In this undated photo provided by the Gilbert family shows Dylan Gilbert, 7, of Naperville, Ill., demonstrating how he helped collect samples of bacteria from his foot during a 2012 study. (AP Photo/Gilbert Family)
Sorry, clean freaks. No matter how well you scrub your home, it's covered in bacteria from your own body.

Pediatricians' Rx for schools: Later start times

Pediatricians' Rx for schools: Later start times
FILE - In this March 14, 2012 file photo, Jan Palmer, a biology teacher at Central High School in Aberdeen, S.D., top right, leads her Advanced Placement/Rising Scholars biology class through a practice test. AP Photo/Aberdeen American News, Kevin Bennett, File)
Pediatricians have a new prescription for schools: later start times for teens.

Study: House calls for frail elders bring savings

Study: House calls for frail elders bring savings
Dr. Eric De Jonge of Washington Hospital Center conducts a Medicare house call at the home of patient Beatrice Adams, in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)
Ten or 12 times a year, Beatrice Adams' daughter would race her frail mother to the emergency room for high blood pressure or pain from a list of chronic illnesses.

Camps take cystic fibrosis patients surfing

Camps take cystic fibrosis patients surfing
Michael Montelone, 10, rides a wave Thursday, July 24, 2014, in San Clemente, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
For three of Rob and Paulette Montelone's five kids, spending the summer surfing is more than just a fun activity. It could also extend their lives.

Have insurers found new ways to avoid the sick?

Have insurers found new ways to avoid the sick?
In this Aug. 11, 2014, photo, Charis Hill, who has a rare form of arthritis that affects the spine, poses in Capitol Park in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Ending insurance discrimination against the sick was a central goal of the nation's health care overhaul, but leading patient groups say that promise is being undermined by new barriers from insurers.

Study questions need for most people to cut salt

Study questions need for most people to cut salt
FILE - In this Feb. 7 2012 file photo, an employee holds packets of salt at a market in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)
A large international study questions the conventional wisdom that most people should cut back on salt, suggesting that the amount most folks consume is OK for heart health - and too little may be as bad as too much. The findings came under immediate attack by other scientists.

US Ebola check means quarantine of missionaries

US Ebola check means quarantine of missionaries
A South Korean quarantine officer, left, checks body temperature of a passenger against possible infections of Ebola virus at the Incheon International Airport in Incheon, South Korea, Friday, Aug. 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Choe Jae-koo)
Missionaries retuning to the United States after working with patients infected with Ebola will be put in quarantine and monitored, health officials said Sunday.

Atlanta hospital deemed 1 of safest for Ebola care

Atlanta hospital deemed 1 of safest for Ebola care
Hospital workers pass police officers guarding an entrance to Emory University Hospital after an ambulance arrived transporting an American that was infected with the Ebola virus, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
The Ebola virus has killed more than 700 people in Africa and could have catastrophic consequences if allowed to spread, world health officials say. So why would anyone allow infected Americans to come to Atlanta?

US doctor with Ebola in Atlanta for treatment

US doctor with Ebola in Atlanta for treatment
A woman in protective clothing drives an ambulance after departing Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta., Ga., en route Emory University Hospital in Atlanta Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
An American doctor infected with the Ebola virus in Africa arrived in Atlanta for treatment Saturday, landing at a military base, then being whisked away to one of the most sophisticated hospital isolation units in the country, officials say.

Fist bumps less germy than handshakes, study says

Fist bumps less germy than handshakes, study says
Minnesota Vikings rookie quarterback Teddy Bridgewater bumps fists with a fan as he arrives for NFL football training camp Thursday, July 24, 2014, in Mankata, Minn. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Jerry Holt)
When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps.

American doctor in Africa gets treatment for Ebola

American doctor in Africa gets treatment for Ebola
In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)
An American doctor infected with the deadly Ebola disease received intensive treatment Sunday in West Africa and was in stable condition, talking to his medical team and working on his computer, a spokeswoman for an aid group said.

More US girls now getting cervical cancer vaccine

More US girls now getting cervical cancer vaccine
FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2007 file photo, Lauren Fant, left, winces as she has her third and final application of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine administered by nurse Stephanie Pearson at a doctor's office in Marietta, Ga. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)
More teen girls are getting a controversial cervical cancer vaccine but the increase isn't much of a bump, the government reported Thursday.

FBI issues warning about air conditioner coolant

As the U.S. tries to phase out a polluting refrigerant that is used in millions of air conditioners across the country, unapproved coolant is popping up on the market - with potentially dangerous consequences.

Genentech Alzheimer's drug misses goals in studies

Researchers say an experimental drug from the biotech company Genentech failed to slow mental decline in tests on more than 500 people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.