Healthworks

An addiction that sits in the palm of the hand

An addiction that sits in the palm of the hand
FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2010 file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg checks his cell phone after a product announcement at Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif. Zuckerberg turns 28 on Monday, May 14, 2012. He's considerably younger than the average FORTUNE 500 CEO, of course. But while some investors worry that Zuckerberg is too young to lead Facebook as a public company, experts point out that Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Michael Dell were in their 20s when their companies had IPOs. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

There's one addiction your college student could have...and they're holding it in their hand.

Can pregnant moms pass asthma along to their babies through plastic?

Can pregnant moms pass asthma along to their babies through plastic?
Bottles of pumped breast milk (Wikimedia Commons photo by ParentingPatch)

Some moms-to-be worry that using products that contain BPA could cause issues like asthma in their children

Think before you ink

Think before you ink
Two men tattoo Hernan Sacarias's back during the 10th annual Buenos Aires Tattoo Show in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Friday, March 7, 2014. The Tattoo Show, which will run from March 7 - 9, is one of the largest events in Latin America dedicated to the art. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Second thoughts about that tattoo? There are options, but they are not pain free

Federal officials cast doubt on Ebola travel ban

Federal officials cast doubt on Ebola travel ban
Administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development Raj Shah speaks in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 3, 2014, about the U.S. Government's response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Top government health officials said Sunday that they are opposed to placing a ban on travelers from Ebola-infected countries, warning that shutting down borders could impede efforts by aid workers to stop the spread of the deadly virus.

Ebola in US: People scared, but outbreak unlikely

Ebola in US: People scared, but outbreak unlikely
FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2011 file photo, passenger Don Heim, right, of Alpharetta, Ga., is briefed by Transportation Security Administration trainer Byron Gibson before going through a new expedited security line at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Ebola has arrived in the United States and people are scared. The nation's top infectious diseases expert said it's perfectly normal to feel anxious about a disease that kills so fast and is ravaging parts of West Africa.

Official: Enterovirus 68 virus caused boy's death

Official: Enterovirus 68 virus caused boy's death
FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 photo, Melissa Lewis, of Denver, helps her son, Jayden Broadway, 9, as he coughs in his bed at the Children's Hospital Colorado in Aurora, Colo. He was treated for the enterovirus 68 and released, but his asthma made the illness more difficult to fight. A wave of severe respiratory illnesses has swept the country in the last two months, propelled by enterovirus 68. The virus has caused serious breathing problems in many children, and now is being eyed as possible factor in at least four deaths, and muscle weakness and paralysis in children in Colorado and perhaps other states. (AP Photo/The Denver Post, Cyrus McCrimmon) MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET OUT; NO SALES; NEW YORK POST OUT; NEW YORK DAILY NEWS OUT
A virus that has been causing severe respiratory illness across the country is responsible for the death of a 4-year-old boy, a state medical examiner determined.

When should you see the doc for your cough?

When should you see the doc for your cough?
File photo

We've all had that annoying cough that comes with a cold. But when should you see a doctor?

Need a mood lifter? Try the produce aisle

Fruits and veggies not only do a body good, they can be good for your brain.

The Healing Powers of Art

The Healing Powers of Art
This undated handout image provided by The Phillips Collection shows an infrared image of Pablo Picasso’s "The Blue Room," painted in 1901. Scientists and art experts have found a hidden painting beneath the painting. Advances in infrared imagery reveal a bow-tied man with his face resting on his hand, with three rings on his fingers. Now the question that conservators at The Phillips Collection in Washington hope to answer is simply: Who is he? It’s a mystery that’s fueling new research about the 1901 painting created early in Picasso’s career while he was working in Paris at the start of his distinctive blue period of melancholy subjects. (AP Photo/The Phillips Collection)

The display of art in hospitals is proving to be an uplifting and healing expericence for patients, families and staff

Cleaning for a Reason

Cleaning for a Reason

 

Women battling cancer get a helping hand at home.

Its time to bust that belly fat

Its time to bust that belly fat

That "spare tire" you have around your waistline could be doing damage on the INSIDE.

Viagra ads target women for 1st time

Viagra ads target women for 1st time
This image provided by Pfizer Inc. shows a new print ad for Viagra, the world's top-selling erectile dysfunction drug. (AP Photo/Pfizer Inc.)
The maker of the world's top-selling erectile dysfunction drug on Tuesday will begin airing the first Viagra TV commercial that targets the less-obvious sufferers of the sexual condition: women.

Pediatricians urge IUDs or implants for teen girls

Pediatricians urge IUDs or implants for teen girls
FILE - In this undated file image provided by Merck, a model holds the Nexplanon hormonal implant for birth control (AP Photo/Merck, File)
Teen girls who have sex should use IUDs or hormonal implants — long-acting birth control methods that are effective, safe and easy to use, the nation's most influential pediatricians' group recommends.

Guilty verdict in peanut trial should send warning

Guilty verdict in peanut trial should send warning
This undated image provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows Salmonella bacteria in a petri dish.
Food safety advocates say a guilty verdict in a rare federal food-poisoning trial should send a stern warning to anyone who may be tempted to place profits over people's welfare.