Developer plans 'out-of-this-world' sculpture in Fremont

Developer plans 'out-of-this-world' sculpture in Fremont »Play Video
An artist rendering of the Saturn solar collector that would sit on top of the Saturn Building along Evanston Avenue North in Fremont. (Courtesy Brian Regan).

SEATTLE - Outer space is about to invade the Center of the Universe, bringing along an "out-of-this-world" visitor to share the spotlight with some of Fremont's most iconic landmarks, including Lenin, the Troll, and of course the Fremont Rocket.

"Saturn is landing," said Brian Regan, a local developer and the brains behind the neighborhood's latest proposed sculpture.

Regan has plans to secure the sixth planet from the sun on top of his five-story office complex on Evanston Avenue North, appropriately named the Saturn Building.

"We are designing it from scratch," he said. "The idea is to make it look like it's floating, look like the real planet Saturn and not fall apart or look tacky."

The 65-foot-tall Saturn Building opened in September and includes 120 units of office and retail space. The new sculpture will not only compliment the Fremont Rocket, which sits across the street from the building, but it will also serve a bigger purpose. 

"There will be solar panels mounted on the rings that circle the planet and will provide enough power for about half of the offices in building," Regan said.

If the city approves his 112-foot-diameter sphere, it would be mounted onto a pole already installed on top of the building. The rings will tilt slightly toward the sun and the entire planet can be rotated for maintenance.

"It would be made out of fiberglass and can be lighted with different colors from inside," Regan said. "Normally it would be bright green and the rings would be lit from underneath."

The Fremont Chamber of Commerce voiced its support for Regan's proposal, writing a letter to the city, and Regan said a building permit has been issued. But because the planet would hang over the sidewalk from the roof the city has to sign off on the plans.

This Tuesday, the city's Transportation Committee, which handles right-of-way issues with the Seattle Department of Transportation, is expected to discuss the idea and may vote on it.