Hundreds apply to grow, process and sell pot in Washington

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The Pot Prospectors Photo Essay
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The Pot Prospectors Photo Essay
Bruce King holds a three-week-old piglet on his farm in Arlington, Wash., in this photo made on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013. King says he was a 22-year-old high-school dropout when Microsoft hired him as its 80th employee in 1986. A software engineer, he eventually left and started or acquired two other companies, telephone adult chat and psychic hotlines, but he really wanted to farm. He found a management team to handle his business and started breeding pigs north of Seattle. After Washington legalized marijuana last fall, he looked at pot as any other crop. The potential margins were “fabulously attractive,” he says. He found a farm with a 25,000-square-foot barn for a marijuana operation. King, 50, doesn’t like pot himself, but says, “If people are going to eat a stupid drug, they should eat my stupid drug.” He likens it to running a psychic hotline when he’s never had a reading. “You don’t have to like Brussels sprouts to grow them.” (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)