Navy Yard shooter’s gun melted down following 2004 Seattle arrest

Navy Yard shooter’s gun melted down following 2004 Seattle arrest
This undated cell phone photo provided by Kristi Kinard Suthamtewakul shows Aaron Alexis in Fort Worth, Texas. The FBI has identified Alexis, 34, as the gunman in the Monday, Sept. 16, 2013 shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington that left thirteen dead, including himself. (AP Photo/Kristi Kinard Suthamtewakul)
Seattle police melted down a gun taken in 2004 from the man accused in Monday’s massacre at a Washington, D.C., navy installation.

Slain gunman Aaron Alexis lived in Seattle during the mid-2000s, and was once arrested following allegations that he shot up a car during a parking dispute. Alexis, 34, was shot and killed inside the Washington Navy Yard following a rampage where 13 were killed and four wounded.

Alexis was living in Seattle in 2004 when he was suspected of shooting out another man’s tires in what police described as an anger-fueled “blackout.” According to police, Alexis' father claimed his son helped in rescue efforts during the Sept. 11 attacks while living in New York City.

Alexis was not charged in the May 6, 2004, incident, but police contend he shot out the tires of a car parked near his grandmother’s home in Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood. According to a police statement, Alexis was suspected of firing three rounds into the Honda Accord’s rear tires before returning to the home, located next door to the construction site where the car had been parked.

The owner of the construction business told police he believed Alexis was angry over the parking situation around the work site. Several workers reported Alexis staring at them prior to the shooting.

Seattle detectives ultimately arrested Alexis a month later. According to police, Alexis told detectives he had been “mocked” by construction workers and said they had “disrespected him.” Alexis also claimed he had an anger-fueled “blackout,” and could not remember firing his gun at the victims’ vehicle until an hour after the incident.

Seattle detectives referred the case to the Seattle Municipal Court for charges. Court records indicate Alexis was not charged.

In a statement issued Friday, a police department spokesman said officers seized Alexis’s pistol following the shooting. The pistol was later destroyed despite an apparent decision by the Seattle City Attorney’s Office not to pursue charges against Alexis.