4/24/2014

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Seattle woman has become a superhero seamstress for sick kids

Seattle woman has become a superhero seamstress for sick kids
SEATTLE -- Families can feel forgotten and isolated when their seriously ill children are stuck in the hospital or at home, but one Seattle woman is armed with capes and is coming to the rescue.

It makes sense that a woman named Robyn would become a superhero seamstress.

"I still wouldn't say I'm a good seamstress, but I can make capes," she said.

Robyn Rosenberg started sewing capes for kids six months ago after reading about a little girl named Brenna.

"The things that she'd overcome, she must have super powers in order to do. So, tiny superheroes kind of just like popped in my mind," Rosenberg said.

She sent Brenna a cape with a big B to cheer her up, and then she started sewing more capes.

"It was like opening a flood gate," she said. 'We are now getting 20 nominations a day. We get them from doctors, grandmas, aunts."

Suddenly the supermom who didn't know how to sew just a few months ago was making colorful capes for sick children around the world.

Six hundred children from Seattle to Scotland, all of whom are fighting serious illnesses, are now sporting Rosenberg's colorful capes, and there's a waiting list of hundreds more.

"We often call these kids special, and they are special -- extraordinary -- and they are different than us and they have a lot to teach us," Rosenberg said.

They're tiny teachers with the power to change our notion of normal.

Eleven months ago, Robin Ullness was diagnosed with leukemia. She'd already met Batman, and now she wanted to meet Robyn.

Rosenberg met the young girl, and she brought with her a very special cape. Robin has not lost her smile, even though she has to go through daily chemotherapy.

"I think that's a big old superpower to put up with stuff that not any of us could put up with, what they've shoved into her," Rosenberg said.

Rosenberg is mailing capes to kids in Oklahoma, and she sent some to children who were hospitalized after the Boston bombings.

All the capes take money for fabric and labor. If you'd like to make a contribution, you can do so here.
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