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Crews hoist second Boeing fuselage from derailment site

Crews hoist second Boeing fuselage from derailment site
This Saturday, July 5, 2014 photo by Brock Sarbeck provided by Wiley E. Waters Whitewater Rafting shows a freight train that derailed near Alberton in western Montana, sending three cars carrying aircraft components down a steep embankment and into the Clark Fork River on Thursday, July 3. (AP Photo/Wiley E. Waters Whitewater Rafting, Brock Sarbeck)
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MISSOULA, Mont. — Crews have removed the second of three commercial airplane bodies from a river embankment in western Montana after they tumbled off a train in a derailment.

Montana Rail Link spokeswoman Lynda Frost says the second newly manufactured Boeing 737 fuselage was winched up Monday without any problems.

She says the third is expected to be removed from the Clark Fork River embankment near Alberton by the end of Tuesday.

Nineteen train cars derailed Thursday, spilling three fuselages into the river and three more near the tracks. Frost says the fuselages and their flatbed cars weigh a combined 70 tons each.

The fuselages and other airplane parts were being transported from the Spirit AeroSystems manufacturing plant in Wichita, Kansas, to Boeing facilities in Washington state.

Ken Evans, senior manager for Spirit AeroSystems, said the company ships 42 of the 737 fuselages each month to Washington state.

"We're at a record rate right now," he said. "We've been doing this for decades, and this is exactly how they've been shipped for decades."

Boeing said in a statement that it has experts at the scene to assess the damage. Marc Birtel, director of media relations, said Sunday that he didn't have information on what the experts have decided.

None of the companies involved offered an estimate of the damage.

Railway officials are investigating the cause of the derailment.
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