'Someone else is going to get victimized a second time'

'Someone else is going to get victimized a second time' »Play Video
SEATTLE -- Sitting in shadow, a young woman in her 20s says she wants to warn others of the crimes that can rob people of dignity and hope.

"Nobody was just there for me. It was just me against the world," she said.

The story she shared with KOMO 4 is the same one laid out in court records. She tells of a party in July of 2009, when she says a University of Washington fraternity president named Kevin DeBoer took her into a room to talk after both had been drinking.

"He closes the door and I see him locking the doors and then he's turning the music up really loud," she said.

She and the court records say DeBoer came at her, demanding sex.

"He kind of pinned me and I couldn't get up and I said,'You can't do this.' I clearly said no, 'No,'" she said.

She says DeBoer violated her sexually.

"After he finished, he laid there just smiling. That smile, it's something sticking with me," she said.

She went to the hospital, and pressed charges, but along the way, the third degree rape charge turned into misdemeanor harassment.

The King County Prosecutor's Office said there were "evidentiary problems" with the 2009 case and DeBoer took a plea deal.

He served no jail time, had 15 days of community service with a $5,000 fine.

But now DeBoer is charged with rape again, accused of drugging and then sexually assaulting his next door neighbor in November of 2012.

Nearly four years after her incident, this victim hopes justice is served -- and hopes sharing her
story from the shadows will keep others safe.

"Someone else is going to get victimized a second time," she said.

In the 2009 case, DeBoer took an "Alford plea," meaning defendants don't admit guilt, but acknowledge they could be found guilty. In this current case, DeBoer's attorney did not return calls.

DeBoer pleaded not guilty this time and will be in court again at the end of the month. His fraternity also had no comment tonight. He is now attending UW-Tacoma's business graduate school, who told us they do not do criminal background checks on students.