11/27/2014

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'The next thing I remember is waking up in the ambulance'

'The next thing I remember is waking up in the ambulance'
EVERETT, Wash. -- A local judge has a plea of her own for drivers to pay more attention. Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Marybeth Dingledy was biking to her bench this week when she crashed right into a car.

The bike she was riding emerged from the crash unscathed, but it was her face that took the brunt of the impact.

"I had 10 stitches between my mouth and my nose I think one of my teeth was in my upper lip," she said. "I found another inside my gums the other day. I have a lot of cuts inside my mouth."

Judge Dingledy also suffered a concussion and broken nose.

"All of a sudden I remember a car turning in front of me and thinking, 'oh, crap!' And the next thing I remember is waking up in the ambulance," she said.

A witness filled in the blanks.

"And he said that the car turned right in front of me, that I did a somersault over the hood and landed on my face and bounced," Dingledy said. "Thank God I wasn't hurt worse."

Off the bench, Dingledy keeps up a demanding physical fitness routine while training to climb Alaska's Mt. McKinley. The trek demands that she carry 100 pounds between her backpack and a sled she'll pull. Dingledy climbed her first mountain in 2006, with the Climb to Fight Breast Cancer.
Over the years, she's raised more than $80,000 for breast cancer researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Then last summer, she got that dreaded diagnosis.

"You realize it may happen to you but it's still different when it actually does," she said.

Breast cancer forced a double mastectomy.

"I had surgery in December and then four days after my double mastectomy, I was riding the bike downstairs to get back in shape."

Now, she's determined to keep her date with Denali.

"Obviously I'll check with my doctors before I go but they didn't' see any obstacles," Dingledy said.

After her accident, witnesses let her know how horrible the driver felt who hit her.

"She certainly didn't mean for this to happen and I don't think most people mean for this to happen," she said. "But it's frustrating when I'm just riding in the bike lane on the road people just need to be careful."

Police cited the driver who hit her.
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