Even beluga whales like mariachi bands

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By Vienna Catalani

Hold on to your sombreros! This is probably the best thing you'll see all day.

A 1,320-pound beluga whale named Juno recently joined in on a fiesta held at the Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut.

According to a senior trainer from the aquarium, when wedding festivities began, the extremely playful Juno must have had his curiosity piqued. Juno was seen with a serious "me gusta" face, dancing along with the mariachis during their performance.

Juno was born in 2002, and has grown to 11 feet, nine inches. He can be identified in the tank by the gray circles around his eyes. Juno shares a tank with two female beluga whales, but they obviously are not into mariachi bands, or perhaps Juno's baile was too hot for their tastes.

Speaking of his dance moves, Juno's seven neck vertebrae actually puts him at an advantage for underwater mariachi dancing, as it provides more flexibility than other whales. I am surprised, however, Juno did not join in on vocals, as beluga whales are known as "canaries of the sea" because of their impressive vocal skills.

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