Why Soap is Bad for Your Face

Why Soap is Bad for Your Face

Have you ever tried a new face wash, had it work great for a few weeks, and then watched your skin go back to its normal dry/oily/combination texture? Most face washes contain basic cleansers that are nonspecific and nonbinding to your skin. This means you must use mechanical trauma, (your own hands, an ultrasonic brush and exfoliating towels are a few examples), to disrupt dirt and dead skin and envelope them in soap particles. 

So, what’s the big deal? As you might guess by the word “trauma,” the act of disrupting your skin over and over again will force it to protect itself. This leads to increased cell turnover and resistance to new products and techniques. Think of the callused hands of a farmer, or the fingertips of a guitar player and imagine your face reacting the same way. Not a pretty sight, is it? Do you want your face to react the same way?
 
The simplest way to keep your skin from overreacting to a cleanser is to reduce the trauma caused by washing your face. One product that helps make that possible is Sericin, a unique protein created by silkworms that binds together the silk fibers of their cocoons. More specifically, it binds to Keratin, which is also found in dead skin cells. Theoretically, applying Sericin to your skin should create a trauma-free way to dispose of dead skin cells, dirt and makeup, while keeping the skin’s pH levels stable. This reduces cell turnover and keeps your face hydrated and healthy.
 
Dr. Justin Piasecki, a northwest skin care expert, and founder of Piasecki MD, discovered a way to biochemically prepare Seracin so that it can be used to its full potential. He created a facial cleanser that replenishes moisture where it’s needed and keeps skin’s pH balance intact. Salicylic Acid in the cleanser eliminates bacteria that causes blemishes and, combined with the Seracin, can help you skin look younger and feel healthier.
 
For more information on Piasecki MD’s Seracin Silk cleanser and other products or to learn more, click here.