How Do The Seasons Differ Near The Equator?

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By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - Those that live near the equator probably don't notice much of a difference between December and July in their wardrobe plans as their temperatures are nearly constant.

Being that close to the equator, the sun's noon position doesn't shift much through the year. If you're on the equator, the sun is directly overhead on Mar. 21 and Sept. 21, and is lowest on both Dec. 21 and June 21, but it's not much to notice.

Matter of fact, the sun's lowest point of the year on the equator (66.5 degrees altitude on the equinoxes) is about the same as its highest point in Seattle on June 21. So with its constant warmer-than-Seattle-sunshine, it's basically about 80-88 degrees all year long in the tropics and it's shorts time whether it's mid July or waiting for Santa.

Your Photos

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Sitting on southbound 405 in Bothell this morning, the traffic information board displayed this message. Obviously the autocomplete function was on and no one proof read the message.

Pretty funny though...
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These two photos of the city Skyline were taken this morning from Kerry Park at Sunrise (6:54 am). Unfortunately there was heavy cloud cover and the Sun was not visible. The Fall Equinox starts this evening, so sunrise will be coming later, and sunset will happen sooner.
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Took these images Saturday night with fog rolling in and out.
A Meade 6-inch refractor and Nikon D3000 DSLR was used for all images.