How Can I Find The North Star?

Tools

By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - As we enjoy the clear nighttime skies, we thought we'd give a little basic astronomy lesson.

If you're ever in a place where you can't figure your direction based on surroundings, you can always use the North Star (or Polaris, as its official name goes) to get yourself oriented.

First, you have to find the Big Dipper. If you need help with that, check the link below, and we'll get you there.

Once you have the Big Dipper, find the two stars that make the forward edge of the cup. If you draw a line from the bottom star, through the top star at the lip of the cup, follow that line for about 2 fist-lengths and you'll arrive at the North Star.

Find The Big Dipper & North Star

www.onr.navy.mil.

Your Photos

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A Washington State Ferry waits its turn to dock at the Lopez Island Ferry Terminal as the sun rises over Mount Baker in the background.
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During my time in Seattle, WA, I've had the opportunity to take all sorts of interesting pictures. There is water everywhere here, and in this shot; it provides a perfect mirror to the road above.
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These images were taken Friday and Saturday under with a bright moon. M42 is a 45 minute stack of 122 frames and M15 is a 34 minute stack of 14 frames. A Meade 6-inch refractor
and a Nikon D3100 was used for all the images. Stacking was
done with Deep Sky Stacker (freeware).