Why Are Tornadoes Most Common In The Midwest?

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By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - The area in the Midwest around Oklahoma, Nebraska, Missouri and northern Texas is commonly known as "Tornado Alley" due to their frequent tornadoes in the spring, summer and fall. But why does Mother Nature pick on them?

Tornado Alley is a frequent battleground between the cold, dry air coming south out of central Canada, and warm, moist air being pulled north from the Gulf of Mexico. Where these two air masses meet are favorable for very strong storm development, and the greater the difference in temperatures between the two masses, the stronger the storms can be.

Tornadoes are most frequent in the spring time because we still have leftover arctic air in Canada from winter to sink south, but the Gulf region has already got a head-start on their warm summer temperatures.

Your Photos

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