Why Is The Coast Always Socked In With Fog?

Tools

By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - It's a June and early-July ritual along the entire Pacific Coast -- being socked in with fog while areas just a short drive inland are basking in the summer sunshine. But it's that summer sun that causes the coastal fog.

The Pacific Ocean stays pretty cold up here -- around 55 degrees -- in the summertime, which keeps the air right near the water cooler than over land. As the warm sun shines on the ocean, water will evaporate, and then quickly condense amid the cool air and form a low overcast or fog bank. The fog will drift inland just a bit since the immediate coastline also stays cool from the nearby ocean.

If we have a westerly flow, the winds will bring those low clouds inland to the Puget Sound region -- aptly named a marine push.

Your Photos

YouNews Before the storm Before the storm
Images of Mt. Rainier looking like a Himalayan peak prior to
the storm that rolled in on Monday night.
YouNews A homeless veteran and his companion dog A homeless veteran and his companion dog
While seated at a Starbucks, a homeless man came in and sat nearby. His scent was unpleasant and people looked at him and rolled their eyes. He was simply doing what we were all doing, drinking coffee and taking advantage of free WIFI. He brought his dog, Legacy, who was well behaved.
YouNews Lufthansa Upgrades Local Service to 747 Lufthansa Upgrades Local Service to 747
Lufthansa has switched aircraft equipment on their daily Seattle-Frankfurt route to a 747-400, seen here departing SEA-TAC today. They are now the only airline offering daily 747 passenger service at SEA-TAC. The upgraded service began March 29, 2015.