Why Isn't It Hot AND Humid Here?

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By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - The Seattle area is lucky in that on days when we get our warmest, it's also drier than normal, keeping us safe from hot and humid days that plague the Midwest and East Coast.

That's because our warmest days come when the airflow is from the north and east instead of off the humid Pacific. That occurs when we have higher pressure east of the Puget Sound area, and lower pressure offshore.

That air from the east is already dry, but as air comes down the western slopes of the Cascade Mountains, it will compress and get warmer and dry out even more. So Seattleites can at least take some solace on our heat waves that "at least it's a dry heat."

Your Photos

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The cloud bands around Mt. Rainier are a sure sign of changing weather conditions. These images of Mt. Rainier were taken Thursday evening around 7:30pm with a Nikon D3000
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Grabbed a few images of Mt. Rainier between 6:30am and 7:30am
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