What Are The 'White Nights'?

Tools

By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - White nights are what those who live near the north pole call the time of year when the sun either doesn't set, or only sets for a few hours (as in, the sky stays lit, or white, during the night).

Starting right about this time of year and lasting through mid July or so, places north of the Arctic Circle (66.6 degrees north latitude) have very little time of darkness, if any. Today, Fairbanks, Alaska (just below the Arctic Circle) has a sunset around midnight and a sunrise around 3:45 a.m. right now.

Go up to Barrow, Alaska (71 degrees north) and the sun hasn't set since May 10, and will stay above the horizon until August 3.

That's because the Earth's forward tilt toward the sun in the summertime is such that the north polar region spins in constant sunlight.

Your Photos

YouNews Up! Up! And away! Up! Up! And away!
When I saw this dramatic cloud to the north, it reminded me of smoke, rising in billows until it hits the jet stream, then it's pulled hundreds of miles east. I had to capture it quickly. Within minutes the effect had faded.
YouNews Inside an osprey nest Inside an osprey nest
For my girlfriends birthday we had a party at her parents. We knew the nest was there but the owner hadn't seen or heard the osprey for a day or two. He asked me to fly my drone up and see if any was wrong. I flew up and found that there were two eggs inside.
YouNews Our Garden Our Garden
The growing season has been great.

The secret to this garden is simple.
I used recycled grass clippings.