What Are The 'White Nights'?

Tools

By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - White nights are what those who live near the north pole call the time of year when the sun either doesn't set, or only sets for a few hours (as in, the sky stays lit, or white, during the night).

Starting right about this time of year and lasting through mid July or so, places north of the Arctic Circle (66.6 degrees north latitude) have very little time of darkness, if any. Today, Fairbanks, Alaska (just below the Arctic Circle) has a sunset around midnight and a sunrise around 3:45 a.m. right now.

Go up to Barrow, Alaska (71 degrees north) and the sun hasn't set since May 10, and will stay above the horizon until August 3.

That's because the Earth's forward tilt toward the sun in the summertime is such that the north polar region spins in constant sunlight.

Your Photos

YouNews New snow for Mt. Rainier New snow for Mt. Rainier
A new blanket of snow arrived on Mt. Rainier during the prior
rain as seen in the photos taken before (August 28th) and after (August 31) the weekend rain.
YouNews Deception Pass Deception Pass
Lovely sunset and silhouettes at Deception pass bridge.
YouNews Sunflowers Sunflowers
Couldn't resist walking over to neighbors to photograph these beautiful Sunflowers they have growing in there yard.