What Is The ''Lake Effect''?


By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - You've probably heard of Lake Effect Snows along the Great Lakes. It's caused by cold arctic air moving over a warm body of water (like Lake Erie) and picking up moisture. The moisture is then dumped in the form of heavy snow squalls along the (frigid) lake shoreline.

But you might not have heard of "Strait Effect" snow. Snow events are rare here, but during the big snow of 1996, the north Olympic Peninsula received a good dose of "Strait effect" snow.

There, you have the frigid winds blowing toward the southwest out of the Fraser Valley. Those winds go over the relatively warm Strait of Juan de Fuca. Then, when the air reaches Sequim and Port Angeles, it rises up the Olympic Mountain slopes, and squeezes out its moisture as extra snowfall.

For More Information:


Your Photos

YouNews Sunset Beach, Oak Harbor Sunset Beach, Oak Harbor
I took this photo tonight at 4:37. Just a calm and beautiful day on the Salish Sea.
YouNews Bordeaux & Paris Bordeaux & Paris

This is my UW daughter and her weekly video from Paris......I think she does a great job and would like to share with others.......especially touching seeing video of where the attacks happened and her feelings....a future news caster...