What's The Difference Between A ''Watch'' And A ''Warning''?

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By By Steve Pool

SEATTLE - You'll see us mention a lot of various "watches" and "warnings" during the fall and winter months.

A "watch" means that conditions are right for the event to happen. So, for example, if we say there's a "High Wind Watch" for an area, that means that high winds are possible, but not imminent. It's an early heads up that something merits close attention.

A "warning" means the condition is imminent or already happening. Thus, a "High Wind Warning" means that high winds are happening now, or are going to happen in the warning area.

Your Photos

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Sitting on southbound 405 in Bothell this morning, the traffic information board displayed this message. Obviously the autocomplete function was on and no one proof read the message.

Pretty funny though...
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These two photos of the city Skyline were taken this morning from Kerry Park at Sunrise (6:54 am). Unfortunately there was heavy cloud cover and the Sun was not visible. The Fall Equinox starts this evening, so sunrise will be coming later, and sunset will happen sooner.
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Took these images Saturday night with fog rolling in and out.
A Meade 6-inch refractor and Nikon D3000 DSLR was used for all images.