Weather Blog

Brilliant fire rainbow and other cool stuff to wrap up the week

Brilliant fire rainbow and other cool stuff to wrap up the week
Photo Courtesy: Toby Smith

I used to call these blogs the "Weekend eye candy" and this one would certainly qualify as I've had a few photos in the hopper that need their time in the sun.

First up is the fire rainbow above, shot by Toby Smith while he was in Eastern Washington in July.

The phenomenon is called a "fire rainbow", or, more boringly, a "circumhorizon arc"

These fire rainbows are fairly rare sights in the mid-latitudes, because they can only occur when the sun is 58 degrees or higher above the horizon. For the Pacific Northwest, that pretty much relegates any sightings to around 6 weeks either side of the summer solstice.

Turbulence In The Skies Over Hansville

It wasn't fire but wind that was the big deal Thursday night over Hansville. Watch this video from SkunkBayWeather.com that shows waves propagating in the clouds -- much like surf. There were colliding winds there from the northwest and the south as a weak convergence zone was starting to form, but just provides a great visual of how turbulent the air can be sometimes:



Perseid Time Lapse

Eric Harlow shot this 5-hour time lapse video from the Salmon La Sac campground Saturday night, August 11, from about 10:30pm until about 3:30am. (Some of the bright streaks are planes, but the faint streaks are the meteors)



Hurricane Strike Map

John Nelson with IDV solutions, who was the one behind this amazing interactive map of tornadoes and earthquakes is back at it again, this time with a track of all hurricanes and tropical storms to strike the globe since 1851.



Come learn about the great Columbus Day Windstorm

Come join Steve Pool, Professor Cliff Mass and a host of others to review and remember the 1962 Columbus Day Storm (October 12th will be the 50th anniversary).

The talk will take place on Thursday, October 11 at 7:30 p.m. at Kane Hall, Room 120 on the University of Washington campus. Mass will discuss the major aspects of the storm and windstorm chronicler Wolf Reed will tell even more. 

You need to register for this if you want to go, and it is expected to fill. Admission is free.