Weather Blog

Photos: Northern Lights dance over Alaska's frozen north

Photos: Northern Lights dance over Alaska's frozen north
Northern Lights shine over Chandalar Lodge and Two Rivers Lodge. (Photo courtesy: Tyler Mode. See more pics at weathercrazy.smugmug.com)

Latest forecasts reaffirm warmer than normal summer for Northwest

Latest forecasts reaffirm warmer than normal summer for Northwest
Sunset over Deception Pass on Oct. 13, 2013. (Photo: Dana Weber)

SEATTLE -- Evidence is growing that after a very soggy February and March, that we're going to dry things up for a while around here.

Latest 30- and 90-day forecasts from the NOAA's National Center for Environment Prediction continue to forecast a long period of warmer-than-normal temperatures through spring and the summer across the West, and are now starting to forecast slightly higher odds of a drier than normal spring as well in the Northwest.

An 'Egg-xaggerated' tale: You can stand up an egg on the equinox!

An 'Egg-xaggerated' tale: You can stand up an egg on the equinox!
Photo of egg standing up on its side on March 20, 2014, courtesy Heidi and Todd Larson of Grace Cafe in Bellingham, Wash.

Happy first day of spring! The planet hit its equinox at 9:57 a.m. PDT and now every second that passes is one closer to the start of summer, or as those on the frozen tundra that is the East Coast will tell you, one second farther away from winter.

Today brings us equal daylight of 12 hours (within a few minutes) and the annual trek to see if you can stand up an egg today.

Potpourri blog: A waterspout (almost), strange radar blob, wind microclimates

Potpourri blog: A waterspout (almost), strange radar blob, wind microclimates

As Western Washington finally gets a chance to wring out after what was a record wet March 16 and may soon be a record-wet March in general (7.69" of rain so far this month; record is 8.40") there's a few interesting weather tidbits of late I wanted to highlight.

First, let's start with the thunderstorm that rolled through the Whidbey Island/Snohomish County areas on Friday. It brought some lightning and hail, but did you know it almost brought us a waterspout as well?

Amazing 'surf' clouds over Lake Tahoe

Amazing 'surf' clouds over Lake Tahoe
Photo of K-H clouds over Lake Tahoe's Diamond Peak, courtesy Darren Springer.

Surfing is quite popular along California's shores, but near the state's eastern border there was a different kind of surfing going on.

Darren Springer posted this great video of "Kelvin-Hemoltz" clouds over Diamond Peak Ski report at Lake Tahoe (technically on the Nevada side of the border there):

A foot of rain in Seattle in 30 days? That's....not that rare

A foot of rain in Seattle in 30 days? That's....not that rare
A rainy window pane on a stormy day in Seattle. (Photo courtesy: Michael Mclaughlin Photography

I was surprised when I calculated the numbers -- Seattle received just over a foot of rain in the 30 days from Feb. 8 through March 10, coming in at 12.01 inches.

A foot of rain? Even in soggy Seattle, that seemed pretty wet, especially since we only average about 37 inches of rain per year.

I knew it wouldn't be a record -- November 2006 had 15.63" of rain. But I figured it had to be near the top?

Gorgeous sun pillar spotted from Seattle

Gorgeous sun pillar spotted from Seattle
Sun pillar over Seattle with the Pacific Science Center arches on the right. (Photo: Dan Lewis)

Wow, what a sight at sunset around Seattle Tuesday evening.

Our Dan Lewis was out snapping photos and got this great shot of sun pillar as the sun dropped below the Olympic Mountains and horizon.

November, December, January put to shame by recent rains

November, December, January put to shame by recent rains
Image courtesy: Puget Sound Clean Air Agency

When it comes to stormy weather, November, December and January annually duke it out for meteorological supremacy in the Puget Sound region.

But not lately. Oh, how the mighty have fallen.

It was bad enough when September claimed the top spot for rainiest month in 2013, it was worse when the three big cheeses couldn't even claim second place (that went to April).

Here comes El Nino; forgive us if we don't cheer

Here comes El Nino; forgive us if we don't cheer
Plenty of snow up at Mt. Rainier's Paradise Ranger Station this year. Will next winter have nearly as much? (Photo Courtesy: Mt. Rainier National Park)

SEATTLE -- Hey everyone, there's a good chance El Nino might be around for next winter!

California: "Yay! The expected heavy rains next winter should help our drought!"

Midwest and East Coast: "Yay! It likely means no more of this 'Polar Vortex' and weeks below freezing!"

Gulf Coast and Eastern Seaboard: "Yay! It typically means less hurricanes!"

Pacific Northwest: *sigh*

It was the coldest winter on record... it was the warmest winter on record

It was the coldest winter on record... it was the warmest winter on record
Left: Megan Pederson is surrounded by snow as she helps clear a neighbors driveway Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, in Mankato, Minn. Right: The sun sets after the Match Play Championship golf tournament on Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, in Marana, Ariz. (AP Photos/Mankato Free Press, Pat Christman and Ted S. Warren)

It's not really a tale of two cities, but more like a tale of two halves of a nation -- one basking in their warmest winter on record; the other wondering if they've become the new Antarctica.

With March signaling the end of "meteorological winter" (December 1 through Feb. 28), cities are crunching their data to find some surprising results!