Weather Blog

Study: Male hurricane names taken more seriously than female ones

Study: Male hurricane names taken more seriously than female ones
Hurricane Isaac over the Gulf of Mexico as seen from a NASA satellite. (Photo courtesy NASA)

I have to admit, I never really give much thought to hurricane names, especially since we don't have to deal with them out here. Since 1979, names have alternated between male and female names and run on a six-year rotation, so that this year's list is nearly identical to the one that ran in 2008, save for any names that get retired when they cause destruction.

The World Meteorological Organization chooses the names -- how a name makes the list is secret but it has to be easy to understand and come from names that represent the cultures of the areas affected. (So for example, in the Caribbean, you have a mix of English, Spanish, Dutch and French names on the hurricane list in deference to the nationalities represented in the many islands there.)

Current snowpack at Paradise Ranger Station among best in last 31 years

Current snowpack at Paradise Ranger Station among best in last 31 years
About 135" of snow sit at Paradise Ranger Station along Mt. Rainier on June 1, 2014 (Photo: National Parks Services Web Camera)

And to think in January, we were worried our mountains were going to go bare..

With the massive rally in February and a continued occasionally chilly pattern, the snowpack up at Mt. Rainier's Paradise Ranger Station is not only healthy, but among the best in the past few decades.

Photos show towering hailstorms over South Carolina

Photos show towering hailstorms over South Carolina
A towering thunderstorm is seen over South Carolina on May 23, 2014 as photographed by Stu Broce with NASA's IPHEX project

We're all likely familiar with what a hail storm looks like from the ground -- around here, it's as if someone dumped gazillions of frozen peas on the ground... if the peas were made of ice.

But have you ever seen a big hailstorm from the top? (And I mean BIG hailstorm, not the "what passes for big in Seattle but Midwesterners and East Coasties laugh as child's play" hailstorm? The kind that could be disguised as a golf ball or, when you're really in for it, a softball?)

Brand new meteor shower set for Friday night

It's not often in a lifetime you get treated to a brand new meteor shower that no one has ever seen before, but that is the case Friday night with the (pardon me a moment while I go copy and paste this:) Camelopardalids Meteor Shower.

This meteor shower with likely the most complex name for journalists to type since that volcano erupted in Iceland four years ago, comes courtesy of Comet 209P/LINEAR, discovered 10 years ago, according to NASA. But two years ago, it was discovered Earth would cross into the comet's dust paths leftover from the 1800s on Friday night.

How a breeze 75,000 feet up might indicate a hot summer for Seattle

How a breeze 75,000 feet up might indicate a hot summer for Seattle
FILE -- Alki Beach in West Seattle packed with people enjoying the sunshine on a hot Seattle day.

You've likely heard the old tale of how a butterfly flapping its wings in China can make it rain here on a weekend, but what if I told you a moderate breeze high above the clouds around the equator could be the reason we just had a very wet spring? Or lend credence to other forecasts that we've got a hot summer looming?

Jason Phelps, now a graduate student at Utah State University after completing his undergraduate Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington, is working on research that could help give long-range forecasters another tool in spotting upcoming weather trends over several months.

Right now, many of those long range forecasts are aided by research in certain oscillations in the atmosphere that occur somewhat regularly over a period of months to decades.

Snowing at 68 degrees in Denver? Nope, just 5" of hail

Snowing at 68 degrees in Denver? Nope, just 5" of hail
5" of hail fall in parts of Denver on May 21, 2014. (Photo courtesy: Denver Police Department)
DENVER - Flights are resuming at Denver International Airport after severe thunderstorms and a tornado warning forced planes to stay on the ground.

Guess what? It really does rain more often in Seattle on Saturdays

Guess what? It really does rain more often in Seattle on Saturdays
FILE -- Visitors to downtown Seattle huddle under umbrellas while walking in the shopping district. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

So here we are again, Seattle.

After a sunny and warm week, the clouds roll in and the showers arrive just in time for the weekend. Just like it did two weeks ago. And if rainy weekends seem like a frequent occurrence this spring, your memory does not deceive you. It's rained on the past four weekends, and five of the last six.

Beautiful billows, bountiful breezes, and busy birds

Beautiful billows, bountiful breezes, and busy birds
Sun sets behind Seattle's Pike Place Market on May 15, 2014. (Photo: KOMO News Photographer Mitch Pitman)

Wow, what a gorgeous evening out there! After a day of temperatures in the upper 70s and low 80s, enough high clouds were around to make a great sunset easel, and our marine seabreeze kicked in to boot to return a comfortable night's sleep.

Several people had their cameras rolling to capture the amazing scenes around the region.

Gorgeous time lapse video shows off intricacies of fog

Gorgeous time lapse video shows off intricacies of fog
Photo: Simon Christen

Nothing shows off the beauty of fog like time lapse video.

Photographer Simon Christen, who put together one of my all-time favorite videos, "Adrift" that shows a series of foggy time lapse videos in San Francisco, is out with a new video "A Time Lapse Collection" that has more fog from the Bay Area, as well as a trip to Dubai.

Northwest climate change report: Shrinking snowpacks, drier summers

Northwest climate change report: Shrinking snowpacks, drier summers
FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2012 file photo, Natural Resources Conservation Service employees Chris Mundy, front, and Nicholle Kovach measure snow depth at a site near Wanoga Snoplay Area west of Bend, Ore. (AP Photo/The Bulletin, Rob Kerr)

Tuesday was a big day in the science community with the release of a major federal scientific report on climate change.

The 840-page report, several years in the making, looks at regional and state-level effects of global warming, compared with recent reports from the United Nations that lumped all of North America together. A draft of the report was released in January 2013, but this version has been reviewed by more scientists, the National Academy of Science and 13 government agencies and had public comment.

It is written in a bit more simple language so people could realize "that there's a new source of risk in their lives," said study lead author Gary Yohe of Wesleyan University in Connecticut.

The report breaks the nation down into 8 geographical regions, including the Pacific Northwest, which for their report encompasses Washington, Oregon and Idaho.